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to encouraging stewardship of the environment, land conservation, watershed protection and eliminating harmful chemicals. additional funding provided by: the colcom foundation. the wallace genetic foundation and by the charles a. frueauff foundation. >> this week on "to the contrary" first, is affirmative action still necessary? then, latina voter turnout and behind the headlines: women who lead drug cartels. hello, i'm bonnie erbe. welcome to to the contrary, a discussion of news and social trends from diverse perspectives. up first, the supreme court and affirmative action. next week justices will hear arguments in an affirmative action case that could change admissions policies at public colleges and universities. it marks the first time the supreme court will address the topic in nearly a decade. fisher v. university of texas at austin involves a white student, abigail fisher, who was denied admission in 2008. it challenges the constitutionality of using race as a factor in admissions decisions. fisher argues the university's race-conscious policy violated her civil and constitutional righ
government to assess impact of the ospreys on the local environment. officials think the aircraft could harm quality of life and natural environment. >>> it looks like a large flying insect. but is actually a man made device to make disaster response more effective. and it is being used by a japanese company to reach damaged sites that are hard to reach. and to send back high revolution, resolution video images. >> it takes pictures. it can shoot a video like this. through the work of of aerial company in this prefecture. they photograph disaster areas across japan. >> translator: the unique thing is it can go places where humans cannot, take photos and gather valuable information. >> reporter: four years ago the team made this unmanned aircraft guided by remote control, it flies to locations, takes pictures and returns. at the end of march last year, the aircraft made headlines. it flew over the damaged nuclear plant in fukushima right after the disaster. from a hite of 400 meters, it took high resolution photos. this shows the first details of the damage. it provided crucial information on
of identifying risky practices that might contaminate the environment or expose workers to high risk, health and safety issues? whistleblowing protection is critical, especially for facilities like the los alamos national laboratory, because of the nature of the work that is done and the kind of materials they work with. >> will take a break and come back. we will be joined also by a guest from the navajo dine nation, to talk about the uranium mines and what happens when they are closed. our guests are chuck montaÑo, former inspector here at the lab who became a whistleblower, and jay coghlan, executive director of nuclear watched mexico. stay with us. ♪ [music break] >> this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are broadcasting from los alamos, new mexico. this state is home to the navajo nation. for decades, they fought uranium mining on their land despite a mining moratorium on the troubled property, the company hydro resources ink is seeking approval to mine near the towns of crownpoint and church rock. uranium has been mined here for mo
. upon it said the pipeline would have devastated the environment and residents a risk of deadly explosions freed last year, activists and biology professor appeared on democracy now to talk about the project. >> the concern from the community point of view is the ecological damage and the risk the pipeline will pose to over 200,000 people, and is also about the economy, reducing cost of energy we [indiscernible] all of the infrastructure of potential benefits. there is no benefit for the people of puerto rico. economically speaking. >> an east texas, activists protesting the construction of the keystone xl will pipeline are continuing their attempts to block tree clearing efforts for a third week amidst reported crackdowns on journalists. two reporters embedded with the activists were arrested and held overnight before charges against them were dropped. activists say transcanada, the company behind oil pipeline, is paying local police to provide security. two journalists from the new york times were held in handcuffs before being released. activists with the tar sands blockade s
of this country. we will also not hear about the global impact of global warming, the environment. we will not hear about climate. we will not hear about global inequality. there is a whole range of issues that will simply not make it on to that debate agenda and the military budget is probably right at the top of the list. tavis: we shall see. two more debates to go. we thank you for your time. >> always a pleasure. tavis: that is our show tonight. you can download our app. thank you for watching. as always, keep the faith. >> for more information on today's show, visit tavis smiley on pbs.org. tavis: join me next time with ethan hawke on his new movie. >> there is a saying that dr. king had he said there's always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we're only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have a lot of work to do. wal-mart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp out hunger. >> and by contributions to your pbs stations from viewers like you. th
can ask for in this environment this week. >> all right. as you can see their opinions here definitely spanning the spectrum. we'll have more of those opinions throughout the day. we'll be back here live at 8:00 japan time with the prospective from the g-7 finance ministers point of view and we'll have lots more. so do please stay with us here. >> all right. thank you very much. >>> and do come to our web site to see all the conversations ron and his team have had with top economists at the imf world bank meeting. the address is right there on the bottom of your screen. >>> now hardly any of the talks at this week's conference begins or ends without mention of europe's financial troubles. they seem to worse within each passing day. spanish leaders are facing even more complications. a u.s. credit ratings agency has downgraded the country's sovereign bonds putting them on the outskirts of junk territory. standard & poors cut spain's rating by two notches. it's gone from triple b plus to triple b minus. that's only one notch above speculative status. s & p analysts blame the downgrade on
. and yet the military remains an important actor in the north korean political environment, and i think what we're seeing is a government seeking to assure its key constituents and to send a signal to the outside world in the face of what they consider pressure from the south and the government is strong and the national security of the north korea the safe. >> it's given that the south has only increased its missile capacity. >> absolutely. and i think we need to trecks last few months have been very tense on the korean peninsula, and there's been no love lost and the outgoing president is seen as someone who is hostile to the north and that certainly is how the knot paints him. this is very much a political gang waiting for the political senses of december and north koreans are not going to give an inch until they see the new president taking over in january. but for now, as you say, they have every reason to take a tough stance. >> thank you for your time on gmt. let's take a look at some of the other stories making hirnes around the world today. mexican authorities say the leader of
to encouraging stewardship of the environment, land conservation, watershed protection, and eliminating harmful chemical. additional funding provide by the colecom foundation, the wallace genetic foundation, and by the charles a.frua foundation. this week on "to th to the con y p. >> first, mitt romney's surge with women voters. then tragedy mars the first u.n. international day of the girl child. behind the headlines, wage theft, a little known problem that costs mainly women workers millions of dollars. hello, i'm bonnie erbe. welcome to "to the contrary," a discussion of news and social trends from diverse perspectives. up first, pushing for women. will a more moderate mitt appeal to women voters? that is what the gop presidential hopeful is counting on as he moves more towards the middle on women's rights. romney generated buzz this week over remarks he made about abortion, saying access to abortion is not on his legislative agenda. regardless, he added he would defund planned parenthood and prevent use of federal funds for abortions. he continues to call himself a "pro-life candidate." mea
bain is doing is that totally egregious given the environment, but we don't know they're doing it before. i think it cuts against this image of bain as this analyzing the really getting in bed with the russian government. i also thought if you look at the things -- go ahead. >> no, just wrap up as quickly as you can. >> if you look at what the bain employees say, they do not have a whole lot of remorse about getting involved with tobacco but some do feel bad about getting involved with the privatization swindle. they think, this may have been something we should not have done. >> zach carter, thank you for being with this, senior political economy reporter at the huffington post. his latest article, co-written by jason cherkis, "mitt romney's bain made millions on big tobacco in u.s., russia." when we come back, we will find out why thousands of workers at foxconn in china walked out as the or making -- as they were making the iphone5. stay with us. ♪ [music break] >> this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman in santa fe, new mexico
bachmann 20 times over. so it's not exactly an environment conducive for great heroic foreign policy. mama, tell your daughters not to grow up to secretaries of state, not now. you want to be secretary of education, not secretary of state. >> rose: (laughs) so what ought to be the foreign policy debate in this campaign? >> well, i tell you what i've been focused on and i think it's about making our own country strong, charlie. making our own country an object of emulation. because that's the greatest thing about america. we have the power of emulation, people will follow and copy us in a way that china and russia can't. china has to bully or buy people and so does russia. and i think getting our own fiscal house in order, continuing to make our universities and school it is envy of the world which they once were and still should be and can be, making our industry and new products, that's the strongest thing we have right now because we live in such an interdependent world now charlie. it's so different. we live in a world where first of all our friend -- our friends collapsing hurts us so
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)